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The Canadian Healthcare Council is an organization that specializes in certification of healthcare institutions and professionals. The standards for hospitals and clinics are included in Canadian federal and provincial regulations. Together with the international standards and best practices provide organizations with the information they need to pursue or maintain patient safety and high performance.
The Canadian Healthcare Council specializes in certification of doctors and healthcare providers. The requirements for certification of professionals are the international standards and current Canadian government statement for medical tourism.
Our governance and directors have over 20 years of experience in developing and implementing many quality accreditation programs in Canada and around the world.
Their work has been in more than 500 organizations in Canada and more than 100 organizations around the world.

Benefits:

Our program is our competitive advantage. Our program was created by Canadian healthcare professionals not general engineers. General quality dimensions cannot constitute the great majority of a program used in hospitals and clinics. A program has to be written and reviewed by healthcare professionals who work and see what hospitals and clinics need. We have technical people who understand the difference between a certification and accreditation. You are not going to find repetitive and archaic requirements in our program.

Client organizations see a return of their investment because you pay what a hospital and clinic in Canada is charged for our programs. The price you pay is not based on what competitors charge you outside of their countries but what Canadian hospitals and clinics pay here in Canada. International Accreditation bodies are blamed for milking poor countries to bring high revenues to North-America but this should not be the rule. The price is set based on what we charge in Canada to facilities and professionals without adding one or two ceros. The price for a visit could be around 14,000 CAN$ for three evaluators for a large and complex hospital. 

Our objective is that professionals and institutions have a return of their investment. As a difference with others, we take the steps to send you patients to your organization. Patients do not know nor have a reason to know about accreditation and certification companies. We have the experience to take the right steps to send you patients to your offices. We give you a superior business position than any other body after you finish our program.

A competitive advantage is our surveyors. As the difference with others, they currently work for healthcare organizations. Healthcare organizations deserve to be visited by active healthcare professionals.

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CANADIAN HEALTHCARE COUNCIL

  • There are thousands of repeated standards for hospital and without value. More than 3500 standards for a complex hospital but there are too many repetitions. The standards could be reduced to the ones that are priority for an organization and have evidence.
  • The Canadian Council has removed all occurrences and identified only what has value to an organization and has evidence. The Canadian Council has learned accreditation bodies should not just add standards and unnecesary work every year.
  • It is not enough to have levels. The standards have to be consistently organized in such stages.
  • The Canadian Council have created four stages of implementation. The standards are consistently set in each stage. Organizations deserve that the benefit of having levels be consistent.
  • The benefit of having levels is irrelevant when there is no consistency.
  • The four stages have been developed by healthcare quality improvement experts as a difference to other accreditation companies.
  • There is not going to be a return of the investment. The price is set based on how much revenue and déficit an accreditation body has. For full preparation and a final visit, the price goes from a minimun of 60,000 CAN$ for a small ambulatory care office to 500,000 CAN$ for a large and complex hospital.
  • The price is set based on what we charge in Canada to facilities and professionals without adding one or two ceros. The price for a visit could be around 14,000 CAN$ for three evaluators for a large and complex hospital.

Preparation:

It is important to have proper preparation. Organizations deserve proper preparation.

Why Canada’s ‘best’ health-care system just got ranked last — again

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http://business.financialpost.com/opinion/william-watson-why-canadas-best-health-care-system-just-got-ranked-last-again

system just got ranked last — again

William Watson: In a New York Times contest of the world's top health-care systems, Canada didn't win. In fact, we were eliminated in the first round

The entrance to a Canadian emergency room.

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 In 2004, the World Health Organization launched the World Alliance for Patient Safety. International Patient Safety Goals promoted by the World Health Organization have helped Canadian organizations and professionals to address specific evidence based areas of concern. The World Health Organization has promoted the Six Patient Safety Goals around the world as the most problematic areas and with the most evidence. Universities across Canada address such areas of concern in their courses for healthcare providers. Despite the multiple organizations in Canada and United States authorized to write healthcare standards, they all recognize the World Health Organization's top areas of risk for an accreditation award:

Goal 1: Identify patients correctly

Goal 2: Improve communication

Goal 3: Improve the safety of high-alert medications

Goal 4: Ensure safe surgery

Goal 5: Reduce the risk of health care-associated infections

Goal 6: Reduce the risk of patient harm resulting from falls

Our hospital safety scores help patients find the safest hospitals outside of Canada.

Old ways won't open new doors.

Join the CEHC movement!

 

* Other recommended Canadian accreditation organizations: Carf Canada, Canadian Accreditation Council, Canadian Centre for Accreditation, CSA Group Testing & Certification, Bureau de normalisation du Quebec, Canadian General Standards Board, QMI-SAI Canada, LabTest certification, and Lloyd's Register Quality Assurance.

 

 

Recent news and articles: https://www.queensu.ca/gazette/

How healthy is the Canadian health care system?

 

File 20170828 1612 bhj9um
Our rapidly aging society will place even greater pressure on the already expensive and mediocre Canadian health-care system. (Shutterstock)
 

Canada’s health-care system is a point of Canadian pride. We hold it up as a defining national characteristic and an example of what makes us different from Americans. The system has been supported in its current form, more or less, by parties of all political stripes — for nearly 50 years.

 

Our team at the Queen’s University School of Policy Studies Health Policy Council is a group of seasoned and accomplished health-care leaders in health economics, clinical practice, education, research and health policy. We study, teach and comment on health policy and the health-care system from multiple perspectives.

While highly regarded, Canada’s health-care system is expensive and faces several challenges. These challenges will only be exacerbated by the changing health landscape in an aging society. Strong leadership is needed to propel the system forward into a sustainable health future.

A national health insurance model

The roots of Canada’s system lie in Saskatchewan, when then-premier Tommy Douglas’s left-leaning Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) government first established a provincial health insurance program. This covered universal hospital (in 1947) and then doctors’ costs (in 1962). The costs were shared 50/50 with the federal government for hospitals beginning in 1957 and for doctors in 1968.

This new model inspired fierce opposition from physicians and insurance groups but proved extremely popular with the people of Saskatchewan and elsewhere. Throughout the 1960s, successive provincial and territorial governments adopted the “Saskatchewan model” and in 1972 the Yukon Territory was the last sub-national jurisdiction to adopt it.


Read this article in French: Système de santé canadien : un bilan en demi-teinte


In 1968, the National Medical Care Insurance Act was implemented, in which the federal government agreed to contribute 50 per cent toward the cost of provincial insurance plans. In 1984 the Canada Health Act outlawed the direct billing of patients supplementary to insurance payments to physicians.

The five core principles of the Canadian system were now established: universality (all citizens are covered), comprehensiveness (all medically essential hospital and doctors’ services), portability (among all provinces and territories), public administration (of publicly funded insurance) and accessibility.

For the last 50 years, Canada’s health-care system has remained essentially unchanged despite numerous pressures.

Long wait times

The quality of the Canadian health-care system has been called into question, however, for several consecutive years now by the U.S.-based Commonwealth Fund. This is a highly respected, non-partisan organization that annually ranks the health-care systems of 11 nations. Canada has finished either ninth or 10th now for several years running.

One challenge for Canadian health care is access. Most Canadians have timely access to world-class care for urgent and emergent problems like heart attacks, strokes and cancer care. But for many less urgent problems they typically wait as long as many months or even years.

Patients who require hip or knee replacements, shoulder or ankle surgery, cataract surgery or a visit with a specialist for a consultation often wait far longer than is recommended. Many seniors who are not acutely ill also wait in hospitals for assignment to a long-term care facility, for months and, on occasion, years.

Canada ranks 9th out of 11 countries in The Commonwealth Fund ‘Mirror, Mirror 2017’ report.
 

And it’s not just accessibility that is the problem. Against measures of effectiveness, safety, coordination, equity, efficiency and patient-centredness, the Canadian system is ranked by the Commonwealth Fund as mediocre at best. We have an expensive system of health care that is clearly under-performing.

A landscape of chronic disease

How is it that Canada has gone from a world leader to a middle- (or maybe even a bottom-) of-the-pack performer?

Canada and Canadians have changed, but our health-care system has not adapted. In the 1960s, health-care needs were largely for the treatment of acute disease and injuries. The hospital and doctor model was well-suited to this reality.

Medical care offered in homes can be more efficient and comfortable than hospital visits. (Shutterstock)
 

Today, however, the health-care landscape is increasingly one of chronic disease. Diabetes, dementia, heart failure, chronic lung disease and other chronic conditions characterize the health-care profiles of many Canadian seniors.

Hospitals are still needed, to be sure. But increasingly, the population needs community-based solutions. We need to “de-hospitalize” the system to some degree so that we can offer care to Canadians in homes or community venues. Expensive hospitals are no place for seniors with chronic diseases.

Another major challenge for Canadian health care is the narrow scope of services covered by provincial insurance plans. “Comprehensiveness” of coverage, in fact, applies only to physician and hospital services. For many other important services, including dental care, out-of-hospital pharmaceuticals, long-term care, physiotherapy, some homecare services and many others, coverage is provided by a mixture of private and public insurance and out-of-pocket payments beyond the reach of many low-income Canadians.

And this is to say nothing of the social determinants of health, like nutrition security, housing and income. None of these have ever been considered a part of the health-care “system,” even though they are just as important to Canadians’ health as doctors and hospital services are.

Aging population, increasing costs

Canada’s health-care system is subject to numerous pressures.

First of all, successive federal governments have been effectively reducing their cash contributions since the late 1970s when tax points were transferred to the provinces and territories. Many worry that if the federal share continues to decline as projected, it will become increasingly difficult to achieve national standards. The federal government may also lose the moral authority to enforce the Canada Health Act.

A second challenge has been the increasing cost of universal hospital insurance. As economic growth has waxed and waned over time, governments have increased their health budgets at different rates. In 2016, total spending on health amounted to approximately 11.1 per cent of the GDP (gross domestic product); in 1975, it was about 7 per centof GDP.

Overall, total spending on health care in Canada now amounts to over $6,000 (US$4,790) per citizen. Compared to comparably developed countries, Canada’s health-care system is definitely on the expensive side.

Canada’s aging population will apply additional pressure to the health-care system over the next few years as the Baby Boom generation enters their senior years. In 2014, for the first time in our history, there were more seniors than children in Canada.

The fact that more Canadians are living longer and healthier than ever before is surely a towering achievement for our society, but it presents some economic challenges. On average, it costs more to provide health care for older people.

In addition, some provinces (the Atlantic provinces, Quebec and British Columbia in particular) are aging faster than the others. This means that these provinces, some of which face the prospects of very modest economic growth, will be even more challenged to keep up with increasing health costs in the coming years.

Actions we can take now

The failure of our system to adapt to Canadians’ changing needs has left us with a very expensive health-care system that delivers mediocre results. Canadians should have a health-care system that is truly worthy of their confidence and trust. There are four clear steps that could be taken to achieve this:

1. Integration and innovation

Health-care stakeholders in Canada still function in silos. Hospitals, primary care, social care, home care and long-term care all function as entities unto themselves. There is poor information sharing and a general failure to serve common patients in a coordinated way. Ensuring that the patient is at the centre — regardless of where or by whom they are being served — will lead to better, safer, more effective and less expensive care. Investments in information systems will be key to the success of these efforts.

2. Enhanced accountability

Those who serve Canadians for their health-care needs need to transition to accountability models focused on outcomes rather than outputs. Quality and effectiveness should be rewarded rather than the amount of service provided. Alignment of professional, patient and system goals ensures that everyone is pulling their oars in the same direction.

3. Broaden the definition of comprehensiveness

We know many factors influence the health of Canadians in addition to doctors’ care and hospitals. So why does our “universal” health-care system limit its coverage to doctors’ and hospital services? A plan that seeks health equity would distribute its public investment across a broader range of services. A push for universal pharmacare, for example, is currently under way in Canada. Better integration of health and social services would also serve to address more effectively the social determinants of health.

4. Bold leadership

The ConversationBold leadership from both government and the health sector is essential to bridge the gaps and break down the barriers that have entrenched the status quo. Canadians need to accept that seeking improvements and change does not mean sacrificing the noble ideals on which our system was founded. On the contrary, we must change to honour and maintain those ideals. Our leaders should not be afraid to set aspirational goals.

Chris Simpson, Professor of Medicine and Vice-Dean (Clinical), School of Medicine; David Walker, Professor of Emergency Medicine, Executive Director of the School of Policy Studies; Don Drummond, Stauffer-Dunning Fellow in Global Public Policy and Adjunct Professor at the School of Policy Studies; Duncan Sinclair, Professor of Health Services and Policy Research; and Ruth Wilson, Professor of Family Medicine.

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

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About us

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About us:

                   

 

The Canadian Healthcare Council is part of an association of Canadian organizations that specializes in certification of healthcare organizations and professionals. 

The Canadian Healthcare Council provides organizations with the information they need to pursue and maintain high standards of patient safety, based on World Health Organization and international standards, and best practices. 

The Canadian Healthcare Council specializes in certification of doctors and healthcare providers outside of Canada. In Canada, it was ratified the UNESCO Convention on the Recognition of Studies, Diplomas and Degrees concerning Higher Education in the States belonging to the Europe Region. We provide information and referral services to individuals and organizations on the recognition of academic and occupational credentials for working and studying in Canada and abroad. The requirements for certification of professionals are up to current international and Canadian regulations.

 

In 2004, the World Health Organization launched the World Alliance for Patient Safety. International Patient Safety Goals promoted by the World Health Organization have helped Canadian organizations and professionals to address specific evidence based areas of concern. The World Health Organization has promoted the Six Patient Safety Goals around the world as the most problematic areas and with the most evidence. Universities across Canada address such areas of concern in their courses for healthcare providers. Despite the multiple organizations in Canada and United States authorized to write healthcare standards, they all recognize the World Health Organization's top areas of risk for an accreditation award:

Goal 1: Identify patients correctly

Goal 2: Improve communication

Goal 3: Improve the safety of high-alert medications

Goal 4: Ensure safe surgery

Goal 5: Reduce the risk of health care-associated infections

Goal 6: Reduce the risk of patient harm resulting from falls

                                   

 

Benefits:

The unique programs of the Canadian Healthcare Council are our competitive advantage. All of our programs are designed, created, and reviewed by Canadian healthcare professionals and international consultants who currently work in the field and can effectively identify the needs of hospitals and clinics.

The Canadian Healthcare Council has streamlined the process of accreditation in order to eliminate archaic and repetitive requirements. 

Client organizations see returns on their investments because they pay the going rate for hospitals and clinics in Canada, rather than the price of competitors outside the country. For a large hospital, the rate for 3 evaluators per cycle is generally around CAN$18,000.

Finally, the Canadian Healthcare Council supports clients by referring new patients to their organizations. Rather than simply adding your organization’s name to a website, we take proactive steps to get patients into your offices.

 

 

 

 

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